2016 Pioneers

The Michigan ACE Women’s Network honored two women as part of its 2016 class of Public Policy Pioneers, each of whom has spent her career championing women’s equality issues as well as matters that impact her community.

Joan Bauer

Joan Bauer

Joan Bauer was recognized for her achievements as a contemporary honoree while Cora Mae Brown was saluted posthumously during the Michigan ACE Women’s Network Annual Conference, which was held June 6-7 at the Radisson Hotel in Lansing. They were recognized during “Voices! Salute to Women and the Power of Public Policy.”

Bauer has been an active leader in her community for more than 30 years. She served six years in the Michigan House of Representatives for the 68th District, which serves northern Lansing. A strong advocate for women’s rights, she introduced House Bill 4851 in 2009, which prohibited paying someone else than “comparable worth.” She also introduced and co-sponsored other bills, including banning smoking from restaurants and businesses. Bauer served as director of volunteer services at Ingham Regional Medical Center, and chaired the Ingham County Women’s Commission. She is a former member of the Lansing Rotary Foundation Board, Lansing Rotary Club, Junior League of Lansing, Capital Regional Community Foundation Board of Directors, and Capital Area United Way Board of Directors.

Cora Mae Brown

Cora Mae Brown

She chairs the 2020 Girls Giving Society and the Capital Area United Way Women’s Leadership Council.

Brown was the first African American woman to become a Michigan state senator, elected in 1952, and the first African American woman to become president of the Senate. Known for tirelessly fighting against the barriers of racism and sexism, Brown dedicated her career to her community, civil rights and women’s rights. While in the Senate, she fought for fair housing, equal employment and anti-discrimination legislation. She was a social worker in the Women’s Division of the Detroit Police Department, later a police officer, and maintained a private law practice. She was appointed special general counsel for the U.S. Postal Service, where she worked until her death in 1972.